Monthly Archives: April 2015

Not your grandpa’s yard barn

Usually, when we think of a backyard shed, we think of the basic building that is used to keep the lawnmowers and garden tools in. The reality is that most of our buildings go for exactly that. In most cases, the job of the shed is to get a bunch of stuff out of the garage so that the cars can reclaim their rightful place. However, it is always fun when people find new and unique uses for small buildings. We have seen playhouses, writing studios, hobby rooms, bunk houses, chicken coops, dog kennels and offices. This post is a little different. I will be highlighting unique uses of small buildings when we come across them, either from our business or articles I read. Let’s get started with this one… The Craft Shack. Someone did a great job of converting an existing 8×12 shed into a crafting space. Do you know of someone who has used a small building for a unique purpose? Let us know in the comments or via email.

This entry was posted on by Shannon Martin.

Beachy Barns From The Sky

Another shed getting ready to head out to a backyard.

This entry was posted on by Shannon Martin.

Beachy Barns Shed Delivery Video

We get asked often about how we deliver sheds. Here is a video that shows our ace delivery driver in action. With this equipment, we can get in some pretty tight backyards. However, if your backyard is not accessible, we can always build your shed right in your yard.

This entry was posted on by Shannon Martin.

How to top off your new shed.

Which is better, shingle or metal roof?

One of the most important components of your shed is the roof. A good roof will last for decades and protect your building and whatever you are storing from the elements that nature throws your way.

We have two main options when it comes to roofs: shingle or metal.

Lets explore each one.

Shingle Roof:

Shingle Roof with Drip Edge

Shingle Roof with Drip Edge

Ever since we started building barns 30+ years ago, the shingle roof has been our most popular roof. Over the years, the 3-tab shingles have given way to the heavier and better looking dimensional shingles that we use today. There is a good chance that your house has dimensional shingles because it is the most common shingle for today’s houses.

For shingles to get their full potential life, they must be applied on a stable surface. We start with full 1/2 inch OSB (oriented strand board) sheathing. We use OSB because it is stronger and more uniform than plywood. OSB also will not bow between the trusses like plywood can. We also use H-clips between each truss on the horizontal seams. The H-clips keep the two sheets from moving independently in the case of snow load or walking on the roof.

OSB sheathing H-clip

OSB sheathing H-clip

We also use metal drip edge along all edges of the roof to protect from moisture running back under the shingles. Finally, the lifetime dimensional shingles are applied per manufacturer’s specs for a handsome, long lasting roof.

Metal Roof:

Metal roof on Highwall Barn

Metal roof on Highwall Barn

Metal roofs have long been used for agricultural and industrial applications and more recently it has seen a growth in popularity in residential applications.

We use trusses at 24″ on center under our metal roof (not 4′). On top of the trusses, we use 2×4 purlins (not 1x or 2×3). Before we install the metal, we use foil bubble insulation. This insulation is to keep the metal from quick temperature changes that produce condensation. Our metal has Kynar 500 paint that has a 40 year warranty.

So which will it be? Either is a great choice. The metal holds up a bit better in high winds. The shingle roof may be a bit more air/insect tight. Both will give you decades of service.

In most cases, it comes down to which you like the looks of or which fits into your surroundings the best.

 

This entry was posted on by Shannon Martin.

5 ways to prepare your site for a Beachy Barn

Most things turn out better if you start with a good foundation. In most cases, our buildings do not need an actual foundation, but it is good to consider what site preparation, if any, is needed.

I am sure there are other ways to prepare your site, but here are 5 options to consider.

1. Blocking. This is the easiest option. All of our buildings have treated 4×4 runners that run the length of the building. We put blocking under the 4×4 at regular intervals. The blocks can be used to level a building if the ground is mostly level. Best for: Works well for smaller buildings. Works well for sites that are relatively level. Blocking is included in the price of the building.

Blocking included

Blocking included

2. Gravel Pad. The advantage of a gravel pad is that it provides support to the building while also allowing for drainage. There are many ways of doing a gravel pad. The gravel can be above the ground or dug into the ground. A 4×4 can be used as a border to keep the gravel in place. Best for: A gravel pad works great for larger buildings. Gravel is also ideal to build up an area that has a drainage issue. In almost any situation, a gravel pad is our preferred site preparation. If you need a contractor that does a great job on gravel pads for our buildings, just contact us.

Gravel pad with 4x4 frame

Gravel pad with 4×4 frame

3. Piers. For a pier foundation, the piers are dug into the ground and set in concrete. Best for: Pier foundations are approved as a frost protected foundation for most zoning jurisdiction. It is also ideal for a site where you have a sloped site. We handle the whole process and can usually install the piers and build your building on the same day.

Gable on pier foundation

Gable on pier foundation

4. Concrete Pad. A concrete pad is a good option. If you have an existing pad, make sure it is level and not too cracked. You don’t want your new building to have a broken concrete floor. In this case, it may be better to have our wooden floor set on top of the concrete.  We can build right on top of an existing pad or one that you have your concrete contractor pour specifically for your new building. When we build on concrete, we use a treated bottom plate and we take care of fastening the walls down to the concrete.

5. Treated Timbers. Another site prep option is to run treated timbers perpendicular to the  treated 4×4 skids that are a part of the building.

Treated timbers

Treated timbers

Our goal is to make getting your building as easy as possible. If you have any questions about preparing your site for a shed, please contact us and we can discus which option would be best for your specific situation.

 

This entry was posted on by Shannon Martin.